Oct. 22, 2019

5: How to spot a liar


It's the age-old question of anyone in law enforcement "how do I know when someone is lying?". Chris Voss has an answer in "Never Split the Difference" ... and it isn't anything about whether they scratched their nose.

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Transcript
Speaker 1:

It's the age old question of anyone in law enforcement. How do I know when someone is lying? Chris Voss has an answer in N ever Split the Difference and it isn't anything about whether they scratch their nose or not.

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welcome to the bite-sized sales podcast where we believe that sales is the most important team in a B to B company, that complacency is the enemy and taking bite-size steps each day to get better at your craft is the best way to improve results. I am your host, Andrew Monaghan, and I'm using my 26 years of experience in B2B sales to bring you small, actionable ideas every day to help you get better.

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I bet the people in law enforcement are probably fed up being asked the question, how'd you know when a suspect is lying? But it's kind of fascinating though, isn't it? You know, we all have our hunches or ideas, things like that. And maybe in reality there's no hard and fast rule or law, but there are indicators that someone may be lying in the book never split the difference by Chris Voss, who was the ex FBI hostage negotiator. He talks about this and to read from the book, he calls it the Pinocchio effect with Carlo Callochi's famous character Pinocchio. It was easy to tell when he was lying. You just have to watch the nose. It turns out that Callochi wasn't far off reality. Most people offer obvious telltale signs when they're lying, not a dry nose, but close enough. Any study of the components of lying. Harvard business school professor Deepak Malhotra and his coauthors find that, on average liars use more words than truth tellers and use far more third-person pronouns. They start talking about him, her, it one they and their rather than I in order to put some distance between themselves and the lie and they discovered that liars tend to speak in more complex sentences in an attempt to win over their suspicious counterparts. It I s what WC fields meant when he t alked about baffling someone with bullshit. The researchers dubbed this t he Pinocchio effect because just like Pinocchio's nose, the number of words grew along with t he lie. People who are lieing are understandably more worried about being believed so they work harder, too hard as it were at being believable. So there you have it. If someone in your work life is being overly verbose, talks about they and we and way over complicates things, maybe you should be, and I bet you can think right now situations o r recent conversations you've had where someone was maybe acting like this and the question you have to ask yourself is are they being truthful.

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